Toasting Romance in Baltimore

I would welcome anyone: to listen to the stories of Edgar Allen Poe while sipping a drink at America’s oldest pub (The Horse You Came In On), to listen to jazz and enjoy local oysters at Keystone Korner, to sail around the Harbour with America’s Sailing Tours, to have a crab feast at L.P. Steamers, to see Fort McHenry where Francis Scott Key penned The Star Spangled Banner, to walk around Fells Point and get lost in the row houses and architecture, to watch a sunset at Canton Park… Then, tell me how Baltimore isn’t a city to love. Baltimore is “Charm City” and it lives up to its name.

Toasting Beacon and the Hudson River Valley

Many of us think about the Hudson River being a barrier between New York City and New Jersey. And, it does serve that purpose…ahem…create that commute. However, north of the city, the Hudson River Valley boasts the Palisades, a castle, West Point, yacht clubs, hiking, and the most adorable towns and small cities. This is our favorite day trip out of the city!

Toasting My Tiffany’s During Women’s History Month

On International Women’s Day, and during Women’s History Month, I’m reminded of Holly Golightly. I know that in our modern world, women are supposed to be always fiercely independent, competent, smart, outgoing, and fully-together feminist badasses. And, trust me…Most of us are exactly that.

But, I think that most of us also feel that unpopular feeling of insecurity, fear, and restlessness. I think we struggle with the mean reds, crafting our identity, fighting against the “lane” that society has chosen for us, and forcing the world to see us for our successes instead of our bodies.

Toasting Pizza, Parties, and Poetry in the West Village

The Statue of Liberty, Fifth Avenue, The World Trade Center, The Empire State Building, and The West Village. Is anything more quintessential New York? The West Village (“Greenwich Village”) is a beloved neighborhood in Manhattan that stems from a progressive place to one of historic preservation and prosperity. Why is it so beloved? Why is it preserved? And, does it still resonate?