Toasting Beacon and the Hudson River Valley

Can you imagine being one of the first explorers to find yourself in the Americas? Many of them found their way to New York, and somehow, thought that China might be just around the bend up the Hudson River…

So, we’ve learned a few things about our globe since those times. But, I think we still can find fascination and wonder in the world around us.

And, thanks to green initiatives, the Hudson River is now flowing clean and gaining wildlife daily. In fact, many blue crabs that are shipped around the world come from this very river!

Many of us think about the Hudson River being a barrier between New York City and New Jersey. And, it does serve that purpose…ahem…create that commute. However, north of the city, the Hudson River Valley boasts the Palisades, a castle, West Point, yacht clubs, hiking, and the most adorable towns and small cities.

This stretch is our favorite day trip out of the city.

Travel

From New York City, the Hudson River Valley starts right away as you reach the northern tip of the Bronx. Taking the Metro Line North from Grand Central or Harlem (125th Street) will weave you through the best views of the river and Palisades.

Our favorite town to spend a day is Beacon. And, it’s only an hour and 45 minutes by train north of Grand Central.

Beacon, NY

After you pass by Tarrytown, Croton-On-Hudson, Cold Spring, West Point, and Bannerman Castle, you’ll find yourself relaxed and feeling seriously chill vibes as you make your way past the train station and up the hill to Main Street in Beacon.

The speed of the city has slowed, and you see nothing but greenery, river views, and the horizon around you. It’s quintessential East Coast and very lovely.

Reaching the top of the hill, you’ll find a coffee shop and ice cream parlor that welcome you to Main Street. From there, you can wander through the multiple restaurants, bars, shops, galleries, and artisan markets. You’ll see a war memorial, a few churches, and many historic buildings that crown the main shopping district.

At the end of Main Street, you will find the Roundhouse Hotel, Restaurant and Events Center. Make sure to stop in for a drink or dining on the patio. You really won’t want to miss the waterfall! (or the Lobster Mac and Cheese…)

Dia:Beacon

Another point of interest that draws a lot of people from New York City is the museum. Dia is a cultural hub in Chelsea, but they have an even larger outpost in Beacon! This museum is modern and quirky and full of interesting pieces. Make sure to reserve your passes early! This place sells out almost daily!

The entire Hudson River Valley is friendly, beautiful, and full of unique shopping, dining, and exploring. The hiking trails are some of the best in New York, and many of the city’s artists call this area their home. You can feel the creative inspiration, energy, and quite literally – the breath of fresh air.

This area is growing rapidly – make sure to visit soon before it turns into New York City 2.0!

More Posts About New York

Should I Come to New York in 2021?

YESSSS!!!! If you live in the U.S.A., then go get your vaccine and come visit! As of April 1, quarantine and testing will no longer be mandated. Quarantining for a few days is still recommended, but we are reaching the end of the formal testing, paperwork, and quarantines for domestic travelers! Huzzah!

***UPDATE*** On April 1, 2021  New York will no longer be requiring quarantines for domestic travel. International travelers will still be required to quarantine. All travelers will need to fill out a NYS traveler form upon arrival. 

You’ve waited patiently, and New York is still here! Start planning your trips!

As always, don’t forget to Toast The Moon to all of your international travels by visiting our store, and make sure to follow us on FacebookTwitter, and the ‘gram to catch all of our latest posts and adventures!

Stay in your region this year, stay safe, stay distant, and be like the NYC statues – wear your masks! We’ll see you on the other side.

Cheers,

Noah and Majhon

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